Monday, May 17, 2010

Glazed and Cinnamon Sugar-Coated Donuts

Tim Horton's is dead to me.  





A few months ago my cousin had a fiesta-themed baby shower, and we got to make some really delicious desserts. One was lime cupcakes, which were great, but the other was churros. I love fried food, and I love churros. They remind me of Disneyland, of the PNE, of fun childhood summers where you get to eat those iconic fair foods in context. And sure, context is everything, but why not bring the fun home? 


So this week I did, and made cinnamon sugar-coated and glazed donuts.





Although the churro-making experience was really fun, and the end result amazing, we didn't properly ventilate the kitchen and the smell haunted me for days. I took that lesson to heart, and this time had my kitchen fan on high, and all the doors and windows open. Big difference. My apartment only smelled like a donut shop for a few hours. Unless it's still there and I've just gotten used to the smell-- in which case, shit.





I was going to tell you how surprisingly easy these are to make, but apparently my definition of "easy to make" is eye-roll inducing, so I'll just tell you they aren't so scary after all, and encourage you to give them a try. 



On that note, thank you everyone for your lovely emails, comments, and recipes. I appreciate all of them, all your love, and will bake as much as I can once my oven is back up and running!


PS. Join Leanne Bakes on Facebook and on Twitter for updates, promotions, contests, and more!





Donut Recipe:
From The Little Teochew
*These directions have been updated a few times. If your questions aren't answered in the comments, you can email me at leannebakes[at]gmail[dot]com and I'll do my best to get back to you as quick as I can. 

A brief note: I recommend a scale, as not all flours (and cup measurements) are made equal. 2 cups of my Canadian flour in my Canadian cups on my scale might be more or less than yours. I have a cheap one like this and it's AMAZING. :) If you don't have a scale, start at 1 1/2 cups and work your way up from there.

Happy baking!

Ingredients
3 tablespoon milk
3 tablespoon boiling water
1 teaspoon dry active yeast
8 oz all purpose flour (a little under 2 cups -- I recommend you measure and weigh. See my note above)
1 1/2 oz sugar (about 3 tablespoons)
1 egg
1 oz butter, cold to room temperature (just don't melt it, okay?)
1/2 teaspoon salt
Enough oil to cover the bottom few inches of a wok, or a deep fryer (I have one similar to this).

For the glaze:


  • 1/3 cup butter
  • 2 cups confectioners' sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 4 tablespoons hot water or as needed

For the cinnamon sugar coating:
1 cup sugar
2-3 tablespoons cinnamon

Directions:
In a large measuring jug, combine the milk and boiling water. Add a teaspoon of the sugar and the yeast. Stir it gently, then leave it in a warm place for the yeast to activate (aka foam).

In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, the rest of the sugar, and the salt. Cut in the butter using your fingers or a pastry blender, until it resembles crumbs.

Add the egg (give it a quick beat) and yeast mixture to the flour mix, and mix into a smooth dough. This usually takes about 5 minutes of mixing.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly-floured counter and knead for about 5 to 10 minutes—it should feel springy and little bubbles should form under the surface. Place it back in the bowl, cover with a cloth or plastic wrap, and let rise for about an hour until double in size.

Once risen, place the dough onto the counter and cut it into 4 pieces. One piece at a time, stretch it into a long rope about an inch to an inch and a half wide. Cut strips about an inch long, ball em up with your hands, and place them on a baking tray or wire rack to wait.

Cover the doughnuts holes with a cloth to rise while you heat the oil to 375F.

Place the doughnuts into the oil and fry until golden brown on each side, about 2 minutes.  Be sure to fry only a few at a time so they don’t overcrowd and stick together.

Drain on a paper towel or wire rack over a cloth, before glazing them. To make the glaze, combine all the ingredients in a small bowl and whisk until smooth. To make the sugar coating, combine the ingredients in a small bowl and whisk until well combined.

Be sure to glaze or sugar coat them warm, or else they won’t get that delicious coverage! 




PS:  Donuts, or Doughnuts?

*This post contains a few affiliate links to products that I love and recommend.

181 comments:

  1. I have never tried deep frying before, but have always wanted to. Do you have a deep fryer, or do you just use a pot/wok? What do you do with the oil after use and what type of oil do you use? Temperature? Maybe a blog on the joys/horrors of deep frying?
    Thanks for your help!
    Angela

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  2. Totally beautiful... those all look amazing!

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  3. The glaze on these doughnuts are killing me!! YUM!

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  4. these look awesome! I just started my own baking blog and I think doughnuts will have to bue on the list. Follow me :)

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  5. Okay - so now the boys at the office are getting annoyed (not their choice of words!)...so when do they get goodies?
    Mom

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  6. Mom: That's your fault not mine! What about the cookies I left? What about the rice krispie squares you're squandering at home?!

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    Replies
    1. huge lol!
      love your blog...just found you on my sister's Pinterest site!

      Delete
  7. Natalie and Memória: Thanks! They're dangerous to have around the house :P

    Kelcie Lahey: Awesome! Will follow back :)

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  8. This recipe got on the "most gawked" page this week on food gawker!

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  9. I never met a donut I didn't like - lol. I've also never made them. They have been on my list of to do's. Your's look beautiful!

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  10. what if i don't have castor sugar

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    Replies
    1. Regular granulated sugar will work just as well, or you can grind it to be a little more fine in a food processor.

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  11. What do you mean by 8 oz. of flour. That is only a cup.

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    Replies
    1. 8oz of liquid is equal to one cup, but 8oz of flour is more. This chart helps explain flour weights: http://www.erikthered.com/flwm.html

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    2. thanks for putting up that link. I was so confused when the mixture was all watery! :) Now I get it.

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    3. I have worked in restaurants all my life and bake a lot. Industry standard for a cup of flour is 5 oz. of flour. So if you do not have a scale, I would use 1 3/5 cups of flour. It is always best to weigh your flour though.

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  12. At first glance, I thought it said "castor OIL". I was like, HUH??? Had to re-read, makes sense now :) These look divine!! Thanks for sharing!

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  13. any ideas for the sour creme one's? I don't make it to Tim's very often, but those are my favorite!

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    Replies
    1. okay, i've been searching and finally found a recipe to try! stay posted...

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  14. The 8oz = 2 cups for all those wondering!!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks! I was just going to look it up and then didn't have to :)

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    2. 8 oz. is one cup !!!

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    3. Of liquid. It's two cups of flour. See here: http://www.erikthered.com/flwm.html

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    4. LoL. I love the spacing. Even when typing one can still get their point across. Here's ur sign......LoL

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    5. 8 oz=2 cups - I don't think is quite right - based on the results I just had this morning :( As I read the comments - I can definitely see that 1 - 3/5 cups would probably have made a big difference. My dough is stiff as can be, and is not rising at all, and I know the yeast is fine - just bought it this week and baked amazing bread on Saturday - and it did bubble before I incorporated it. Not sure if I'm going to go ahead and try to deep fry this thick dough or not.

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    6. Just call it Indian Fry Bread, when I lived in Utah they called it scones, but anyway thats what we did with stiff bread dough

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  15. Replies
    1. I totally agree, but tend to write donut because it's what the people google *facepalm of shame*

      All other spelling is Canadian, however!

      Delete
  16. If u just want the glazed donut, do you still toss them in the castor sugar before?

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    Replies
    1. nope! just go ahead and glaze 'em

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  17. is the castor sugar like powdered sugar?

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    Replies
    1. it's a superfine sugar, like berry sugar. Regular sugar will still be super tasty (sugar coated donut is still sugar coated donut), but the fine stuff coats the donut best :)

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    2. C&H use to make a Bakers Sugar. Anyone know if it's still around?

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    3. Yes it is you just have to look for it. Its a smaller box than the C&H granulated sugar.

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    4. You can get big bags of c&h Baker's superfine sugar at big box stores like costco

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    5. Castor sugar is synonymous with powdered sugar or confectionery sugar, it just depends on where you are buying it that changes what its called:)

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    6. No, it isn't castor sugar is not powdered sugar. It is baker's sugar in the US, castor sugar in Europe. Powdered sugar is icing sugar in the UK. Not even close to castor sugar. Here we have golden castor sugar as well, which is lovely.

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    7. Castor sugar is not powdered sugar. It is like normal sugar only with finer grains. You can grind regular sugar down to castor sugar quickly. If you grind too long you'll get powdered sugar. It's a texture thing.

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  18. I found these on pinterest and have to try and make them soon. So happy to have found your blog and am now following you. When you have a chance come by and check out my blog Quest for Delish.

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  19. ......and the apartment smelling like a doughnut shop was a problem ~ why?

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    Replies
    1. It gets in my hair... and then I smell like oil. :s

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  20. what temperature do i deepfry the doughnuts at?

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  21. I wonder, can I make this dough in my bread maker?

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    Replies
    1. Another commenter did, and it turned out great. :)

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  22. Would you add to the recipe and include how much oil, what kind of pan you fry in, and the oil temperature? Thanks!!

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    Replies
    1. Another commenter mentioned: "I think she said a wok works best, she uses canla oil and 350 is actually alili higher then she likes hers to get."

      I now have a deep fryer, so I don't use my wok as much-- but it's really great!

      Delete
  23. I think she said a wok works best, she uses canla oil and 350 is actually alili higher then she likes hers to get.

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  24. How much is 1 1/2 oz of castor sugar?
    Into cups or tablespoons.

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    Replies
    1. I believe it's about 1/3 cup, but I suggest measuring it to be sure. :)

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  25. Do you know how much sugar to use in measurements of tsp or Tbls?

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  26. Finally got around to making these. Easy. And oh my goodness I think I died and went to heaven. It's a good thing this recipe only makes 24.
    The glaze was absolutely perfection on these.

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    Replies
    1. Lol @ it ONLY making 24. They must be that good! Cant wait to try these.

      Delete
  27. Thanks so much for sharing, my husband can't wait for me to make this dough.

    The other thing I must say the best Christmas gift I received was a new scale for the kitchen, since the world of food blogs, pinterest and google it has been a mind saver for me.

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    Replies
    1. I can't live without my scale...got from amazon...not much money...

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  28. We only have whole wheat flour at the house right now but I REALLY want to try these today! Anyone know if they would turn out okay or just be horrible? Thanks! Karin

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    Replies
    1. They definitely wouldn't end up as light and fluffy... but I'd rather have whole wheat donuts than no donuts at all...

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    2. If you have any gluten you can add a 1/2 tbsp per cup of flour and lighten the wheat flour a lot. I causes more air to become trapped in the Doug as it rises and cooks, resulting in courtier wheat bread/doughnuts.

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  29. Okay people... I made these yesterday according to directions. It ends up being close to 2 cups flour and 1/3 c sugar.
    TODAY I decided to try it in the bread machine. We just pulled it out from being on the dough setting and it did BEAUTIFULLY! I added the warm water and milk first, then egg, flour, butter, sugar and yeast.
    Oh and I had enough glase left over yesterday that I think it will work for the batch I'm doing today. :-) I'm also gonna try letting them rise just a tad before I fry them to see if they could be even lighter. I'm a sucker for Krispy Kreme's melt-in-your-mouth fresh doughnuts, and thought *maybe* that would make these a little lighter. Though in my opinion, they're wonderful the way they are too! :-)

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    Replies
    1. Awesome! I might need to invest in a bread machine soon.

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  30. Doughnut. It's a dough nut, not a do nut

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  31. so it's over 2 years later, I hope your place doesn't still smell like donuts. You made me laugh. I like eating Donuts (no matter how they are spelled) and am definitely going to try your recipe.

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    1. Thanks! It definitely doesn't smell like donuts anymore :)

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  32. I would love to have the cinnamon ones..... Oh goodness. I'll stick to glazed though. Don't want to have an allergic reaction from cinnamon.

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    Replies
    1. I hear you-- I'm allergic to way too many foods. The glaze is just as delicious though!

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  33. Do you think you could bake these? Or would they be too dense?

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    Replies
    1. oh! Same question from me!

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  34. Can you bake these in the oven?

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    Replies
    1. I haven't tried it, but if you can't fry them it could be worth a shot!

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  35. What does it mean in the recipe to "rub in the butter"?

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  36. I feel this recipe needs A LOT more explanation and clarity, perhaps some pics would help......I'm still going to try them with the info I've gathered from the comments.

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    Replies
    1. I hope the comments help you! My kitchen is far too dark to take step-by-step pictures, and it's not my style preference. Happy baking! :)

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  37. Made these today and the dough did not rise. Thought it might have been the yeast so I went to the store and bought fresh. Made them again and they still did not rise. Do you melt the butter or add it at room temperature?

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    Replies
    1. If your dough didn't rise, chances are the water was still to hot. It needs to be cooled to around 100 deg. F. or it will kill the yeast. Dead yeast = no rise.

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  38. Hello...I want to try this today, but for the glaze do you melt the butter? hope you can answer today!!!

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  39. DOUGHNUTS! Donuts is for lazy people who don't bother to spell.

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    Replies
    1. Who the hell cares??? Maybe small petty people!

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    2. who cares! I guess you think short hand is for lazy people too! We aren't stupid! We all know how to spell, or we wouldn't be here to read! DUH!!! It's just a shortened word, that's quicker to type into small areas. The point got across! why does it bother you so????
      This is a wonderful DONUT recipe!!! =0)

      Delete
  40. the smell of frying thing? we always just soak a dishtowel in white vinegar and then wring it out. when it's dry enough that it's not in danger of flinging vinegar all over the place, hold one end of the towel and then make circles in the air over your head with it, kind of like those crazy fans at some games do. the spinning vinegar towel creates a current that pushes the oily smell molecules around and then the vinegar uses it's magical smell reducing properties to clean the air.

    it's also fun.

    plus the donuts look fabulous.

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    Replies
    1. Lol as i read this i imagined my husband walking in and seeing me spinning a vinegar laced dishtowel over my head!

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  41. will be trying this for my friends. i would go with Winchell's & Dunkin who opt for the d-o-n-u-t spelling.lol

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  42. Help! I just set my dough to rise and my husband just decided to go on a spontaneous overnight getaway. I won't have time to rise and fry. Will the dogh freeze well at this step?

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  43. When you say flour, what kind? AP, cake, AP/SR?

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    Replies
    1. Just your normal run-of-the-mill AP

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  44. Good for homemade donuts, but DEFINITELY NOT Krispy Kreme quality nor taste.

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    Replies
    1. I actually hate Krispy Kreme... Tim Horton's is where it's at.

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  45. Just made these! I both live at high altitude (almost 9,000ft) AND made them with whole wheat pastry flour. So, my changes were to add in a teaspoon of dough conditioner, add a tablespoon of unflavored protein powder, slightly decrease the yeast (one and 3/4 tsp ish), added a tiny bit more salt and water. I let it rise to double (slowly) twice, then rolled them out and cut them into squares and rounds and let them rise again. I tried to do them in the rolled balls like the recipe calls for, but they did not cook in the middle. I found with them being whole wheat and having the altitude to contend with, rolling them out and then letting them rise made them perfectly light! Delicious! Thank you for sharing!

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    Replies
    1. Awesome! I'm so fascinated by high altitude baking.

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  46. I just made this, and these are not doughnuts. They are scones.

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  47. ps finally a reason to pull out my bread machine :)) can't wait!!

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  48. Will veg. Oil work lol ?

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  49. These are so delicious!!! My mom has an extreme sensitivity to chemicals and oil so I don't get around to song much with ol

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  50. *doing anyway I have been craving Krispy Kreme for forever but I couldn't resist when I saw this recipe I think they actually taste like Krispy kreme!! Anyway m

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  51. These were excellent...I just turned thirteen so my mom hates me frying baon or fying anything for hat matter but she's napping...I'll surprise her!! :) visit my baking blog at www.lovethebaker.blogspot.com I love baking too hehehe:):):)

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  52. Over 2 years later, I just stumbled onto this recipe today. For ounces-challenged folks like me, below is the recipe written out as you would need ingredients, in tsp/cup form.

    "T" = TBS, or Tablespoon/s, and
    "t" = tsp, or teaspoon/s, and
    "c" =cup/s
    Castor sugar is sugar ground finer; can be done in a food processor or coffee grinder; do not grind all the way to a powder, though.

    Doughnuts
    3 T milk
    3 T boiling water
    1 t castor sugar
    2 t dry yeast

    1/3 c castor sugar (less 1 t used above)
    1/2 t salt
    2 c flour
    2 T butter
    1 egg, beaten

    oil

    Follow directions posted above.

    My only question to Leanne; are the 2 T butter (for the doughnut recipe, not the glaze) meant to be cut in (w/ a pastry cutter) or melted and then added?

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    Replies
    1. We're making our first batch right now; will weigh in later tonight on the finished product. Also want to try them with whole wheat flour as suggested in the comments, but do not have any dough conditioner. Wish I could ask Holly Anthony if dough conditioner is the same as dough enhancer (I have the latter on hand).

      Delete
    2. The jury is in; our boys enjoyed them.

      The dough needed an extra 2 1/2 TBS water to mix smoothly.

      For whatever reason, our dough (though good and frothy) didn't really rise, and the 10 minutes kneading tasted like it had been kneaded much too long, but we used a cup to cut the doughnut shapes (after rolling out the dough), and a small circular item to cut out the holes. We made about 16 small doughnuts, about 3x2x1.

      The glaze is what made them--mmm, mmm! We halved the glaze recipe, and it was the perfect amount to glaze all the doughnuts.

      Delete
    3. I'm curious. Did you melt the 2 tlbs of butter and add to the mixture? That's what I would have done and if you didn't perhaps that's why the dough was too dry.

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  53. My sister and I made these today. DELICIOUS!

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  54. Another quick way to make donuts are to use biscuits. You just buy non flaky kind and have hot grease going, Squish them out, drop them in till brown and then put them in a paper bag of your favorite covering, sugar, brown sugar, powdered sugar etc. Enjoy. Biscuits are easy to keep in the fridge and you can do this when you camp also.

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  55. I did something wrong apparently because mine don't taste like doughnuts. I think the sugar measurement was off somehow. I feel like a dunce. They taste like buns with sugar on them. Sad...

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  56. I soo much love your humour...it makes me smile and chuckle ! We're in the same boat....my 'state of the Art' Convection oven decided to shut down without warning...aggghhh !!! I feel your pain....where are those appliance super hero's when we need them ?? haha Hope we both get them sorted soon....holidays are a coming ! I jut love your recipes...thank you, Mary <3

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  57. This recipe looks/sounds amazing. I need to make these... now!!! :) thanks for sharing!

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  58. I found you through Pinterest and I have to say those doughnuts look yummy! Thanks for sharing. I will have to make these for my family.

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  59. I did it!!!!! I made these and they tasted soooo GREAT!!!! I cant get these around my hometown anymore so THANK YOU!!!! I have been craving these for over two years :-)

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  60. do you have a recipe for cream filled donuts and how do you fill them and i make these donuts all the time and they are great

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  61. I love frying doughnuts, reminds me of my childhood. A quick note to test whether your oil is hot enough...put a popcorn kernel in your oil, when it pops oil is hot enough to fry.(thank you pinterest).
    I have been doing this for a while now and it has not failed me yet.

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  62. You say to use 1 package of active dry yeast, which is 2 1/2 teaspoons. Then in the actual directions you say to just add a single teaspoon of the yeast. And nowhere else do you mention to add the remaining yeast. Is 1 teaspoon all that is added? If so why does it say you will need an entire package? If you add the rest of the package in, what step is this done in? You left out some steps.

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    Replies
    1. Sorry I meant 1 package is 2 1/4 teaspoons

      Delete
  63. I've read over your directions over 1/2 dozen times. Based on the comments I'm reading here and how confused I was by some of your steps, I would say you need to learn how to write your directions better. Most novices that attempt this simple recipe would be confused by some of your steps. I would consider myself between novice and intermediate at baking, I have made things much more complex than this, this recipe should be simple to follow. I can re-write it for you if you like so that its less confusing for everyone.

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    Replies
    1. I would consider myself intermediate at best and her recipe seems clear to me. That was quite rude. If you can understand it well enough to rewrite it, it can't be too difficult...right?
      Thanks for sharing, Leanne! I just found this on Pinterest and am looking forward to trying them soon. :-)

      Delete
  64. Wow! This recipe sounds great! Do you know if I can use a doughnut cutter instead of making little balls?

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  65. I just tried making these donuts. when i mixed the ingredients, the dough was tough and crumbly. then when i put it on a floured surface to knead, there were no bubbles that formed at all!! put it back in the bowl to rest....and it did absolutely nothing! Are these measurements correct? only 1 tsp. of yeast? 2 cups of sugar? and what does an ounce of butter equal to>? HELP...I am craving these

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    Replies
    1. I had the same exact problem. I threw in the towel. Definetly need step by step directions or better NORMAL measurements. These looks amazing and I would love to make them. HELP!!

      Delete
    2. These are "normal" ingredient measurements, and the US equivalent amounts are in brackets. :) And I'm not sure where 2 cups of sugar is coming from, it's 2 cups of flour!

      A quick google says that 1 oz butter = 2 tbsp (try this: http://www.traditionaloven.com/culinary-arts/cooking/butter/convert-ounce-oz-to-table-spoon-tbsp.html)

      Delete
    3. And I'm not sure where 2 cups of sugar is coming from, it's 2 cups of flour!

      Delete
  66. Hi Leanne,

    I found your recipe and photograph linked to a fake spam site on Pinterest and found the original recipe posted by you by using google image search. You can find the pin here: http://pinterest.com/pin/118149190196053025/

    Please report it and take whatever action you see fit because they are stealing content - and not for the first time either!

    Best wishes,

    -Awanthi

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  67. Love your recipes and your sense of humor, thank you so much for the recipe!

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  68. I just wanted to say I had issues getting the yeast to rise and I'm no stranger to making breads! But I just gave up and went about making them. I made half with the glaze and the other half I dipped the dough in salt... OMG quick and easy pretzels! And they were so tastey!

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  69. Oh my dear Lord. I only deepfried a "test batch" so far but now I'm too busy stuffing my face to make the rest. And I royally SUCK at making anything involved with yeast, but these are just simply too amazing.

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  70. Well shoot...add me to the list that can't seem to make these work. I tried two batches of dough, and can't get it to rise properly (proofed the yeast properly)...I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong. Not giving up though...these look too yummy :)

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  71. I would recommend purchasing a scale. They aren't expensive and will save you the hassle. Some ingredients are better measured by weight in certain recipes. I prefer to just be told how many cups or portions of a cup to use but sometimes the results vary when you use cups vs ounces. If i can get krispy kreme-like doughnuts, it's worth going the extra mile :)

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  72. If i shape these into doughnuts (with the hole in the middle) will they rise correctly on the second rise? Im trying this recipe tomorrow and thought I'd ask.

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  73. This this recipe was amazing. I just made them today and they came out perfectly. I found this on Pinterest, and it mentioned they taste like Krispy Kreme, and if its done right, they really do! My husband ate a plateful and said as much before I told him that was my goal, to replicate the Krispy Kreme since we don't have one nearby. This was great, thank you so much!

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  74. And thank you for your edits, and for keeping up with this and all the replies even two years later! Your dedication and great recipe has made me want to follow your blog, thanks for all the hard work! Especially for us newbie baker/cooks :)

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  75. I just made these. I actually made a double batch of donuts and was originally going to do half glazed half cinnamon sugar. I ended up with all glazed because your glaze recipe was enough for them all. Definitely keeper here!

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  76. Can self-rising flour be used?

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  77. I am in the process of making these now. I followed the instructions exactly as stated. However, my dough was very crumbly and dry. I added a tad bit of milk to get it to stick together. I have it sitting, waiting on it to rise. The dough is very heavy, not light and fluffy like most dough I have worked with before. I am no expert, actually I am a beginner, but something just doesn't seem right. Is there something I have done wrong? I haven't cooked them yet so I can't say how they turned out. I do know I haven't written them off, they look SO good!!!

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  78. Those look absolutely amazing! Gonna make this recipe soon :)

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  79. This recipe only takes 1 teaspoon of yeast?

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  80. On seeing them, I feel very hungry!They look so amazing and I can't wait a minute to do it myself!

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  81. Made these tonight.
    Easiest donut recipe EVER. And soooooo soft and yummy and all that sweet stuff.
    AMAZING recipe
    And it really does take one tsp of yeast
    Cola1984

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  82. yummy!!! It looks so tasty! Using automatic donut machine will make it more delicious! Why not have a try?

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  83. I am working on a donut roundup for my site and would love to link to these! Do you mind if I use one of your pics with a link to the recipe?

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  84. Just found you via Pinterest. The recipe got me here. The comment about the fried food smell made me a follower. Still laughing...

    Elizabeth M.

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  85. These sound AMAZING!
    If I dont have a mixer, how long should the 5 minute mixing take by hand?

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    Replies
    1. It'll be a bit of a workout, but is totally doable. When not using a mixer, I like to start with a fork then use my hands. Shouldn't take much longer if you really have at it. :)

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  87. I live at 8500 feet and had to decrease my oil temp. to about 320 degree's and let them cook for 2-3 mintues. I also found I got better rise by increase my yeast by a teaspoon. My kitchen is freezing, like it stays at around 55 degrees so I had to warm up my oven and put a bowl of water in the bottom before the dough even thought about rising for me . . . had to do the same thing once they were in little balls. Covered them with a warm towel and kept them in the oven on warm until the oil was ready to go.

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    1. Great tip for the Denver area too! Thanks!!

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  88. Crispy Cream here I come ... no way will I make these ... I am begging for trouble!!!

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  89. I HAVE TRIED 3 TIMES TO MAKE THIS DOUGH....IT NEVER RISES. THE YEAST NEVER BUBBLES...I DID HOTTER THEN COOLER WATER....I AM JUST WANTING THEM MORE NOW...I HAVE DIFFERENT POUCHES OF YEAST NONE OF THEM BUBBLE....WHAT IS MY PROBLEM....FYI I ALSAYS BAKE AND COOK, NEVER EVER HAD THIS PROBLEM

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    1. If the yeast never bubbles/froths, it's definitely the yeast that's the problem. I'd take it back to the store and try a new pack. Be sure to store it in the fridge once it's open, and keep your eye on the expiry date.

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  90. Wouldn't adding boiling water to yeast kill the yeast??? I'm just curious. I want to try this recipe but I'm not sure if it would kill it or not.

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    2. The yeast is never added to the boiling water. The boiling water is combined with the milk - so the mixture the yeast is added to is warm.

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  91. Any recipe for the white cream inside the chocolate covered doughnuts its my favorite

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  92. Delicious, I will try this recipe one day.

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  93. i tried this recipe this morning and its been over an hour and my dough hasnt risen....a little disappointed but im gonna try to fry them anyways....

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  94. Can I use almond milk instead of cows milk?

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    1. I have a nut allergy and have never used almond milk, but it sounds worth the experimenting if you can't use dairy. :)

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  95. These were awesome! My kids devoured them. Said they tasted enough like KK to be satisfied. My wife liked them too. Said they were better than KK (which she loves, but not the glazed). Added them to our recipe book! Thanks so much!

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  96. Won't the boiling water kill the yeast? Don't you have to let it cool down first?

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    1. The boiling water is combined with the milk - so the mixture the yeast is added to is warm.

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  97. if you can't get your yeast to foam or your dough to rise here is a tip:
    get a bowl and fill it half way with hot water. get another bowl that is slightly bigger than the first one and place it over the second one. put either the dough or the yeast mix in the second bowl and cover with a hand towel. this will keep the bottom and top warm and yelp it either foam or rise. It works really well!!!

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  98. I have jut made this, and after a lot of problems with my yeast, I have to say this tastes amazing! The glaze is glorious

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  99. How do you get them in to the frying pan with out the dough going flat again?

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  100. Great little recipe! Thanks for sharing.

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  101. I should try it def. thanks for sharing

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  102. How long do these keep ? I want to make them ahead of time, before serving. Can the dough be refrigerated and fried later?
    Recipe sound great and very simple.

    Julia

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  103. How many donuts does this recipe make? I would love to make them for a gathering of around 110 people?

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  104. Do you just combine everything for the glaze recipe?

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  105. The comment on the PINTEREST post says, "Homemade Krispy Kremes... the actual recipe. Is this true?

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